The web site for all professionals and consumers who've made or want to make water a part of their lives

0By Jim McCloskey

From time to time, I’ll come across a fountain or waterfeature where jets or streams of water are used to suggest “motion” on the part of an accompanying fixed object. The objects in question are typically made of stone or metal – that is, materials embodying solidity, heft, timelessness and the utter absence

0By Jim McCloskey

For me, one of the highlights of the 20th Anniversary Celebration for Genesis was the place most of us stayed:  The Allegretto Vineyard Resort is a spectacular facility created as an extension of the imagination of the property’s owner, Douglas Ayres.

The hotel embodies an eclectic blend of design concepts, from dashes of feng shui to dollops of talk-to-the-land spiritualism mixed in with

After sizing up the situation with the Neptune Pool at Hearst Castle, William Rowley took the next step and developed an engineering plan to aid in restoring the plumbing system, structure and overall functionality of one of the world's most recognized and celebrated watering holes.
After sizing up the situation with the Neptune Pool at Hearst Castle, William Rowley took the next step and developed an engineering plan to aid in restoring the plumbing system, structure and overall functionality of one of the world's most recognized and celebrated watering holes.
By William N. Rowley

The first of this pair of articles mentioned that Julia Morgan had completed the architecture program at Beaux-Arts in Paris in three years rather than the usual five, but I didn’t mention all of the circumstances.

One of the rules of that institution prohibited the instruction of students after their thirtieth birthdays, which seems a totally bizarre limitation to us now but apparently made sense to French academicians at the turn of the 20th Century.  Given the delays in her gaining a position at the school, she’d entered the program with the clock ticking and really had no choice but to

0By Jim McCloskey

When I wrote about Lawrence Halprin’s Keller Fountain in Portland, Ore., in August 2012, I had meant to cover its Portland cousin, the Lovejoy Fountain, within a few months that have now turned into several years.  Apologies for failing to double back sooner, because they really do fit together better than this span of time would suggest.

Lovejoy Plaza was the first completed installation in what is now known as

Just visiting Hearst Castle's Neptune Pool is awe-inspiring. But being asked to evaluate its condition and make recommendations toward its rehabilitation? That, says William Rowley, was like a waking dream -- and a major recent milestone in his long, distinguished career.
Just visiting Hearst Castle's Neptune Pool is awe-inspiring.  But being asked to evaluate its condition and make recommendations toward its rehabilitation?  That, says William Rowley, was like a waking dream -- and a major recent milestone in his long, distinguished career.
By William N. Rowley

Through the years, I’ve had the privilege of working on a number of historic swimming pools. From grand old plunges at Yosemite National Park to the small patio pool at the Virginia Robinson Gardens in Beverly Hills, Calif., I have often approached these treasured artifacts with two sets of eyes – first as an expert in forensics who figures out how the original design and construction came together, then as an engineer tasked with returning these precious vessels to good working order.

Among all of the historic pools I’ve worked on, two of them fill me not only with pride, but also with the awesome sense that I’m collaborating with Julia Morgan, a woman for

3 21 18TL0By Jim McCloskey

The first time I visited my friends in Branson, Mo., it was a town in the midst of an identity crisis: It had built its brand as a place for mature folks to go hear popular music offered by performers cherished by their generation, from Andy Williams and Lawrence Welk to Roy Clark and Glen Campbell. The acts were still great, but they had largely become

0xHis survey of St. Louis's fountains finally carried Jim McCloskey to Aloe Plaza and 'Meeting of the Waters.' a wonderful set of river-themed sculptures, well worth a visit.  And let's not forget all of the controversy kicked up when the composition was first unveiled in 1940!

 

 

 

 

0By Jim McCloskey

While in Venice, Italy, last summer, I came across a most unusual fountain in the Biennale Gardens near the city’s historic Arsenale: It’s a tall, slightly overgrown tribute to Giuseppe Garibaldi, the Italian general, politician and nationalist who is counted among the founding fathers of the modern Italy.

I almost put the word fountain in quotation marks

 

1By Jim McCloskey

One of the most fascinating college courses I ever took was on the history of science and technology. It focused entirely on Europe, which was limiting. But as I discovered almost immediately, there was so much cool stuff to cover that broadening the content would have turned an already brisk survey into no more than a shallow collection of dates and places.

The ten-week curriculum was

 

11 15 17TL0By Jim McCloskey

I had traveled through Italy before, but I’d never been to Venice – and arrived there late in June 2017 with all sorts of expectations and suppositions about what I’d find, especially when it came to water.

The city is a collection of islands in a marshy

 

0By Jim McCloskey

The watershape was way off any path I’d ever beaten around New Orleans: It sits north of downtown along the shores of Lake Pontchartrain, and I was genuinely surprised to make its acquaintance.

This was back in November 2016, when my wife and I were heading with my brother and his wife to their home in Mississippi after my


Transporting us to another time and place, Mike Gannon discusses one of the great artistic and horticultural convergences of all time -- and brings it all up to date by defining the ways he uses that historic collaboration to inspire his designs in the here and now.
Transporting us to another time and place, Mike Gannon discusses one of the great artistic and horticultural convergences of all time -- and brings it all up to date by defining the ways he uses that historic collaboration to inspire his designs in the here and now.
By Mike Gannon

It’s 1889.   You’re at the World’s Fair in Paris, what the locals call l’Exposition Universelle du 1889, and you’ve joined them in marking the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution.  The world is changing:  Paris is at the center of those transitions and you want to see for yourself what’s going on.

You know that the fair has attracted exhibitors from around the world, but you’re drawn to France because

0By Jim McCloskey

I figured in traveling to Iceland early in July, we’d be seeing nature’s bounty on incredible display – and I was right.  The rivers were tumbling, the waterfalls roaring, the wildflowers on brilliant display.  Along the way, we saw geysers, boiling thermal pools and 24 hours of daylight that kept everything on display as long as we had any energy left to burn.

For some reason, I also expected Iceland to be a place where lots of fountains and water displays would be

CRYSTAL FOUNTAINS VIDEO SHOWCASE


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