WaterShapes World Blog

Not Enough or Too Much
Between the ravages of protracted drought and devastation of widespread flooding, the summer of 2022 will be remembered as a season of extremes. Besides realizing the obvious point that weather that is either too dry or too wet is dangerous, these crises illustrate the need for investment in, and commitment to, long-term infrastructure solutions. ...
Thriving Beyond Recession
Who are the companies that thrive after times of economic hardship? The Harvard Business Review conducted an extensive study of that very question during the peak of the last “great” recession. As we now face a growingly uncertain economic picture, considering what they found may be of use today.    ...
The Disconnected River
Lazy rivers have become a mainstay in countless waterparks and resort pool facilities. As Eric Herman points out here, it is vitally important that when properties advertise the presence of a lazy river, that it actually fits the definition. As he recently discovered, it’s a surprisingly big disappointment when that turns out to be untrue. ...
United by Water
As we approach the 4th of July, 2022, Eric Herman offers a unique summation of our history and ongoing relationship with the world of water. As he points out, creating water infrastructure and technology stands among our society’s greatest achievements.    ...
Extracting Water from Dry Thin Air
Over a third of the world’s population lives in arid climates where water is scarce. A new technology developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Texas at Austin have synthesized material that might be able to help water-insecure people access safe drinking water in areas where it doesn’t rain. ...
Preparing for a Familiar Battle
The lines are being drawn. In a narrative that has become familiar to many in the watershaping industry, pools, spas and other water features are at risk of severe filling and even building permit restrictions as a result of the historic drought impacting some of the industry’s western markets.   ...
Citizen Science on the Move
You don’t have to have PhD to participate in the scientific process. “Citizen scientists” are playing a larger and larger role in the collection and assimilation of data and observations across a spectrum of areas of study, including research about the health of natural watershapes of all types and the impact those conditions have on a variety of species. ...
The Sky is Drying
Just few short months ago, a series of big storms raised hopes that the current drought gripping much of the western U.S. had been doused. Now, following a period of record-low precipitation, looming water shortages and restrictions are a near certainty. ...
The Ancient Beauty of Cenotes
To the ancient civilizations of the Yucatan Peninsula, bodies of water known as cenotes were both essential in daily life and worshiped as the watery portals to the netherworld. Today, these remarkable natural bodies of sub-surface water remain objects of enchantment, and great places to take a dip.     ...
Admiring Japanese Garden Design
The tradition of Japanese Gardening has been inspiring designers for centuries. As Eric Herman points out, it’s equal parts philosophy and technique that is aimed at representing and celebrating nature – a set of ideas and disciplines that can deeply influence watershapers who take time to explore these spaces with an open mind and an open heart. ...