pipes

2020/1.2, January 22 — Small Considerations, Corporate Teamwork, Helical Sweep and more
THE ESSENTIAL E-NEWSLETTER FOR WATERSHAPE DESIGNERS, ENGINEERS AND BUILDERS January 22, 2020 www.watershapes.com FEATURE ARTICLE…
Subtle Precipitation
This project started in a most unusual way, with the client telling me how little he liked the property he and his wife owned and that a move was likely in the near future. But in the meantime, he said, she wanted a pool. So there I was, sizing up a challenging site and wondering if
Modern Mystique
When the call came, it was immediately apparent just how narrowly defined my efforts on the project would be. The basic design for the pool and its spa was already complete, which made perfect sense given how completely they had been integrated into the home's overall footprint. What the architect wanted, I learned, was an expert who could come in, evaluate the plans and basically keep him and his team out of trouble with respect to all of the details and practicalities related to
2019/7.2, July 24 — Digital Delights from the WaterShapes Archives — and more
THE ESSENTIAL E-NEWSLETTER FOR WATERSHAPE DESIGNERS, ENGINEERS AND BUILDERS July 24, 2019 www.watershapes.com FEATURE ARTICLE/August…
2018/7.1, July 11 — A Special Edition — WaterShapes’ Greatest Clicks!
THE ESSENTIAL E-NEWSLETTER FOR WATERSHAPE DESIGNERS, ENGINEERS AND BUILDERS July 11, 2018 www.watershapes.com FEATURE ARTICLE/November…
Defining Delicate Tasks
The first of this pair of articles mentioned that Julia Morgan had completed the architecture program at Beaux-Arts in Paris in three years rather than the usual five, but I didn't mention all of the circumstances. One of the rules of that institution prohibited the instruction of students after their thirtieth birthdays, which seems a totally bizarre limitation to us now but apparently made sense to French academicians at the turn of the 20th Century.  Given the delays in her gaining a position at the school, she'd entered the program with the clock ticking and really had no choice but to
2017/4.1, April 5 — Longwood Renewal, Water Bowls, Mid-Century Revelations and more
THE ESSENTIAL E-NEWSLETTER FOR WATERSHAPE DESIGNERS, ENGINEERS AND BUILDERS April 5, 2017 www.watershapes.com FEATURE ARTICLE…
Imagination Renewed
When the management at Longwood Gardens announced in late 2014 that the Main Fountain Garden would be taken offline and become the subject of a $90 million restoration project, anyone who has ever visited the gardens had to be happy. I've been a regular visitor and huge fan of the Longwood for most of my life, and it's been sad through the years to watch various systems break down and the overall performance of what was left gradually
All Aboard!
In recent years, cities across the United States have found that restoring their old train stations is a great way to attract people and commerce to downtown districts that have seen better days.  These revitalization projects have picked up the pace in cities from Washington, D.C., to Los Angeles, and they seem to work best when old, original functions are preserved and mixed in with the new.That's precisely the direction that redevelopment of Denver's historic Union Station has taken:  The classic, Beaux Arts-style building, which opened in 1914, lost almost all of the
Burying Masterpieces
When I listen to people as they stare at a fountain, I often hear them say, "How wonderful!"  In witnessing that praise, however, I know for a fact that what they find appealing is the gracefulness of a sculpture or the beauty of the stone or tile finishes or the way the water flows - what I refer to as the fountain's "façade."   In many cases, what's behind that façade can be pretty mundane:  maybe a small pump, some simple plumbing, a cascade head or sconce and little more.  In other cases, however, what's going on behind the surface is