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200211BVB0By Brian Van Bower

“Without goals, you become what you were.  With goals, you become what you wish.”
                                 -- James Fadiman

As I’ve grown in my personal life and as a businessperson, I’ve come to recognize a powerful relationship between basic axioms (such as the one just above from James Fadiman) and the setting of my own goals.

To paraphrase Mr. Webster, an axiom is a self-evident truth or proposition.  Many are quite familiar, so much so that phrases including “Honesty is the best policy” or “Nothing

200210SR0By Stephanie Rose

Most people who know me will tell you just how independent I am.  Some, in fact, will say that I’m too independent for my own good.

When it comes to business, however, I know that being a soloist carries me only so far:  Rather, it’s the relationships I’ve established and maintained within the business community that have taken me beyond the independent realm and helped me achieve the success I was looking for when I started my business.

As a designer, I work

200210BVB0By Brian Van Bower

I don’t know if it’s because I work in the pool and spa industry or if this is common to other fields, but I know a great many people who run businesses who are ill-prepared to do so.

Architects and landscape architects might have taken some classes that introduced them to basic business principles, but their counterparts in the pool and spa trades are far less likely to have taken such classes and tend to run things by the seat of their pants.

In my case, I’ve learned what I know about business through seminars and business-oriented reading.  I’ve made

200209BVB0By Brian Van Bower

All through my career, I’ve never really been big on advertising.  In fact, the only place I’ve ever advertised is in Naples, Fla., where I’ve never been successful drumming up any business even though it’s only a short distance from my home.

I gave it a good shot – a nice ad with a picture of a vanishing-edge pool, placed in a local newspaper’s special section on backyard swimming pools.  I was confident I’d get some response, but all that came back was

10 year logoBy Dave Peterson

‘As is true of many business sectors, the architecture, engineering and construction industry . . . has its own language,’ noted Dave Peterson to start his March 2009 Currents column, ‘and the construction documents generated by those professionals (watershapers very definitely included) are the medium through which everyone communicates.  

‘The challenge for watershapers is that we’ve

Most watershapers would agree that it’s relatively easy to build excellence into projects that come with large budgets – and that it’s much harder to stay on the path to quality when working in the mid-range market. Rather than compromise and degrade the product (which happens far too frequently, says G. Bruce Dunn of Mission Pools), the savvy contractor should focus on finding ways to deliver at the highest level, even for clients of modest means.
Most watershapers would agree that it’s relatively easy to build excellence into projects that come with large budgets – and that it’s much harder to stay on the path to quality when working in the mid-range market.  Rather than compromise and degrade the product (which happens far too frequently, says G. Bruce Dunn of Mission Pools), the savvy contractor should focus on finding ways to deliver at the highest level, even for clients of modest means.
By G. Bruce Dunn

To my way of thinking, even a so-called average swimming pool is a wonderful thing.

It’s a product we place in a backyard for the long haul, a product that provides an ongoing recreational experience, operates reliably, enhances lifestyles and adds to property values while offering quality family benefits.  With that in mind, I firmly believe that we as an industry must collectively make the decision that there’s no place for second-rate construction.

“Bargain construction” doesn’t work in our industry simply because of the

200207BVB0By Brian Van Bower

Working outside your home region is exciting stuff.  It opens you to a broader and often more dynamic arena for doing business and lets you work with new sets of clients and their architects, landscape architects and designers.  The projects are typically interesting and often unusual, and you can make a good dollar while reaping the personal benefits that come with travel to faraway places.

On the one hand, being in demand for long-distance projects represents a measure of success in your business and shows the high degree of confidence others are willing to place in your skills.  The simple fact that clients are willing to

The relationship between watershape design and watershape construction is obviously crucial, observes landscape architect Mike Heacox – but it’s often misunderstood, which means that working out the balances can be crucial to success. Here, he offers a designer’s perspective on the relationship, outlining his views on the dynamic, delicate and potentially awesome partnerships that can develop between the pencil and the backhoe.
The relationship between watershape design and watershape construction is obviously crucial, observes landscape architect Mike Heacox – but it’s often misunderstood, which means that working out the balances can be crucial to success.  Here, he offers a designer’s perspective on the relationship, outlining his views on the dynamic, delicate and potentially awesome partnerships that can develop between the pencil and the backhoe.
By Mike Heacox

As a contractor, do you ever wish that you could avoid fussing with clients about design and could instead just get down to the business of building watershapes and getting all the details right?  Do you ever think you’re wasting the time you spend on design, because you know your prospects might go with another contractor despite the time you’ve spent drawing pretty pictures?

Not every watershape contractor will answer “yes” to the first question, but I’m sure most of you have at least thought “yes” about the second one.  That’s because most contractors I know don’t charge for design, at least not directly.  As necessary, you’ll hire

200206DT0By David Tisherman

In one way or another, visual acceptance is what makes our world go around.   

Think about the clothes we wear, the cars we admire, the foods we eat – not to mention interior design, home and office furnishings, landscapes and watershapes.  So much of our response to these and other features of our environment is based on the visual.  It may sometimes be a shallow response, but human beings tend to like things that look good, even if they don’t completely understand why some things are visually appealing and others are not.

Design education teaches us that

200205DT0By David Tisherman

Of all the things I’ve learned in my work as a watershape designer and builder, one particular point stands out:  When it comes to ensuring quality results and a project’s success, there’s absolutely no substitute for good supervision!

I say this knowing that most job sites run by people in the pool industry are inadequately supervised if they’re supervised at all.  Yet experience shows, time and time again, that while complete, professional plans are part of success and that great subcontractors are essential, constant oversight is the absolute

200203BVB0By Brian Van Bower

One of my least favorite activities is testifying as an expert witness in legal disputes over watershaping projects gone awry.

As a rule, I try to stay out of courtrooms for any reason, but from time to time, I reluctantly agree to offer my opinion as a witness if I think I can help generate a fair outcome.  Despite my best intentions, however, I seldom see it as time well spent.

The process is often stressful, and I know deep down, regardless of who’s right and who’s wrong, that lawsuits are

200202BVB0By Brian Van Bower

At nearly five months and counting, it’s clear that many of us are still trying to sort out, understand and learn to live with the events of September 11, 2001 – and I suspect that, on some levels, we will be doing so for months or even years to come.

Over and over again, we’ve been told how our lives are now different.  Although it’ll still take us a while to find out what “different” really means, we know already that we’ve lost a certain amount of innocence.  We’ve also lost a certain naiveté about the way things are in the wide world and are now reevaluating many things, from big important issues such as airport security to more modest concerns such as

200201BVB0By Brian Van Bower

Whenever I’d call my mother on the phone when I was a kid, she’d start the conversation by asking me, “Are you smiling?”

Back then, I never gave her greeting too much thought because that’s what young people do:  They ignore their parents’ wisdom until they realize at some point just how smart the old folks could be.  As I’ve grown older and gained experience in business and life in general, it has occurred to me that my mom’s question is important and even a bit profound.  

At first blush, this notion of smiling on the phone is sort of silly.  After all, no one sees your face when you’re on the phone, so who cares about the expression on your face?  But the truth is, this question of whether or not you’re smiling on the phone has everything to do with

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