The web site for all professionals and consumers who've made or want to make water a part of their lives

10-year logoBy Brian Van Bower

‘For years,’ wrote Brian Van Bower to kick off his Aqua Culture column in the December 2005 edition of WaterShapes, ‘conventional wisdom has held that many of the advances in watershape design incubate in the commercial realm and then slowly percolate over to the residential market as our clients ask for features they’ve seen on vacation and elsewhere.’

‘That paradigm holds up to this day in many ways, but what’s less acknowledged

5-yrsBy Brian Van Bower

‘Not long ago,’ wrote Brian Van Bower at the start of his Aqua Culture column for the November 2010 edition of WaterShapes, ‘I was reminded in a big way of the importance of understanding the international nature of our industry.’

‘It was July, and my Genesis 3 partners . . . and I were on the Gold Coast near Brisbane, Australia, presenting a program at the Splash! Conference – an experience that, once again, underscored the fact that

10-year logoBy David Tisherman

‘The creation of something outstanding, something that stirs an emotional response, something that establishes an ongoing, extraordinary experience for clients and anyone else who sees our work all starts with the passion we have in our hearts for art and its intimate relationship to what we do as watershapers.’

That’s how David Tisherman opened his Details column in the October 2005 edition of WaterShapes.  He continued:  ‘I believe that unless you appreciate and

10-year logoBy Brian Van Bower

‘Through the years,’ wrote Brian Van Bower at the head of his Aqua Culture column in the October 2005 issue of WaterShapes, ‘more than a few watershaping professionals have asked me how to break through and start working with high-end clients.  

‘I respond by giving them the disappointing news that there is no magic key here:  Serving the high end takes

9-9 zaretsky feature 1For many years, Bruce Zaretsky faced the annual need to generate enough income to keep his business and his staff going through New York's long, cold winters.  Here's a look at few of the most successful sidelines he found in his quest to keep the seasonal wolves at bay.

 

By Bruce Zaretsky

As you read this, some of us in upstate New York are already thinking about

10-year logoBy David Tisherman

‘Few things are as important to the aesthetic impression made by swimming pools, spas and other watershapes as the colors you select to use in and around them,’ wrote David Tisherman in opening his Details column in the September 2005 issue of WaterShapes.  

‘Take tile as an example.  Whether it’s just a waterline detail, a complete interior finish or some elaborate mosaic pattern, it serves to draw the eye into a design.  If the color and material selections work, the scene can become

15yearsagoBy Brian Van Bower

‘The way I see it,’ wrote Brian Van Bower to start his Aqua Culture column in August 2000, ‘we watershapers can look at ourselves in one of two ways:  as diggers of holes in the ground that hold water, or as artists working with one of the most exciting mediums on the planet.  For a lot of reasons, I like the second of those options, because the first is passive – the sole goal being to contain the water – while the second gets me more

For someone who started out as a pool designer who never visited his clients' backyards, Jeromey Naugle has come a long, long way -- and knows how important a part digital technology has played in his progress as a professional 'paradise expert.'
For someone who started out as a pool designer who never visited his clients' backyards, Jeromey Naugle has come a long, long way -- and knows how important a part digital technology has played in his progress as a professional 'paradise expert.'
By Jeromey Naugle

Back in 2001, I took a job working for a high-volume pool-construction firm as one of its 30 salespeople.  For the first four years or so, I did all of my design work by hand.  

Quantity was always king in that operation, so I never even left the office:  Someone would hand me a set of plans and I’d start working, despite the fact I’d never walked the site, seen its surroundings or had any

10-year logoBy David Tisherman

‘Everywhere you turn these days,’ wrote David Tisherman to start his Details column in August 2005, ‘you see watershapers tackling projects that would have been unthinkable even a few years ago.’  

‘With this broadening list of possibilities, however, . . . [t]he industry’s like a teenager with a fresh driver’s license:  just because he or she knows how doesn’t necessarily mean that

5-yrsBy Bruce Zaretsky

‘If you ask my employees,’ wrote Bruce Zaretsky in starting his July 2010 On the Level column, ‘they’ll tell you that I’m an unrelenting pain in the neck – a real tyrant.  That’s because I’m always asking nagging sorts of questions such as, “Why isn’t this project finished yet?” or “How much longer is this going to take?” or “Can you speed things up?”

‘My questions, of course, are somewhat unfair.  . . .  But I have no reluctance to come across as a tyrant

While readily acknowledging that digital-design technology has forever changed his working life, Greg Smith also knows that the software is just one of several tools he uses to communicate the value and extent of what he wants to achieve in his clients' backyards.
While readily acknowledging that digital-design technology has forever changed his working life, Greg Smith also knows that the software is just one of several tools he uses to communicate the value and extent of what he wants to achieve in his clients' backyards.
By Greg Smith

I started out on the construction side of the pool industry nearly 20 years ago.  Back then, I probably experienced the building process a good 500 times, picking up insights into what determined the level of success of each project.  

As time passed, I found myself being drawn to the design side:  I saw it as a way to put all of those insights to good use; more important, I knew it was where I could do the most good for homeowners.

In making the transition, I

10-year logoBy David Tisherman

‘Every single project I design and build,’ wrote David Tisherman near the top of his Details column in July 2005, ‘is fully, individually engineered, and I refuse to make any assumptions on my own about what might be needed in a set of plans to create a sound structure.  If any builder anywhere thinks that he or she knows enough to get by without support from a structural engineer, well, that’s just asking for trouble.’

‘I know what I don’t know, frankly, and I sleep well at night knowing that

In transitioning from hand drawing to digital design, writes Bobby Thomas, it's essential that you don't get so caught up in the speed, power, bells and whistles of the technology that you forget why you're there -- that is, to meet the needs of the site and your clients.
In transitioning from hand drawing to digital design, writes Bobby Thomas, it's essential that you don't get so caught up in the speed, power, bells and whistles of the technology that you forget why you're there -- that is, to meet the needs of the site and your clients.
By Bobby Thomas

As all professional designers know, prospective clients can be unpredictable.  Sometimes they get in sync with what we’re doing right away, and it seems every step is a positive one.  Other times, however, they can be slower to figure things out, and the process can become more complicated.

I started working for a pool-construction company soon after graduating from college with a degree in industrial design.  This was before

CRYSTAL FOUNTAINS VIDEO SHOWCASE


Click 'play' to watch the current showcase video

watershapes-extra

resource-directory