The web site for all professionals and consumers who've made or want to make water a part of their lives

10-year logoBy David Tisherman

‘If there’s one thing about the watershaping world that continuously drives me crazy,’ wrote David Tisherman in his Details column in March 2006, ‘it’s the existence and persistence of a sub-professional mindset that says creative designs and affluent clients deserve one set of standards, while projects with more affordable designs can acceptably be built to another, less stringent set of standards.

‘To me, middle-class clients who’ve commissioned modest projects

5-yrsBy Bruce Zaretsky

‘For years,’ wrote Bruce Zaretsky to open his On the Level column in the January 2011 edition, WaterShapes ‘has celebrated the beauty, majesty and positive potential of water in the landscape.  We’ve seen it flowing down waterfalls, over vanishing edges, across slopes and through the air.  We’ve seen what happens to colors immersed in it, how it creates shimmering light patterns, how it works its way over stone and, perhaps most important, the

Given all the details that can get in the way of smooth performance, it's easy to see why it's tough to take a watershaping act on the road. The key to success at a distance is, of course, planning, but as Barry Justus reports, it also helps to be patient -- and lucky.
Given all the details that can get in the way of smooth performance, it's easy to see why it's tough to take a watershaping act on the road.  The key to success at a distance is, of course, planning, but as Barry Justus reports, it also helps to be patient -- and lucky.
By Barry Justus

Working on the road can be tough.  As was discussed in the first of this pair of articles (click here), it can get even rougher when you’re working on a cliff in a remote area and have been asked to build a big watershape in a place where all sorts of environmental rules and restrictions apply and there are also plenty of easy-to-upset neighbors.

I thought we were ready for all contingencies as we prepared ourselves, the design, the plans, the permits and the site.  I was even prepared to deal with the half-load restrictions imposed to protect thawing

5-yrsBy Bruce Zaretsky

‘One of the most common themes repeated in [WaterShapes] is that selecting materials for projects can make the difference between truly artistic designs and those that are either inappropriate or just plain boring,’ wrote Bruce Zaretsky to open his On the Level column in the December 2010 issue.  

‘Materials truly matter, and the importance of knowing your options and

Completing a project at any real distance from your home base is difficult, notes Barry Justus. But with careful planning and project management, it's possible to make it work -- even if you start in the dead of winter.
Completing a project at any real distance from your home base is difficult, notes Barry Justus.  But with careful planning and project management, it's possible to make it work -- even if you start in the dead of winter.
By Barry Justus

Working on a large-scale project is a challenge when it happens even ten miles from your home base:  Big jobs are just plain tough.  But building that same project 150 miles away?  That takes the difficulty to another level – and when you mix in an extremely difficult, environmentally sensitive site, it can feel as though you’re operating on another planet.

A case in point can be found in our participation in a design/build project on a remote cottage estate in the stunning

10-year logoBy Brian Van Bower

‘For years,’ wrote Brian Van Bower to kick off his Aqua Culture column in the December 2005 edition of WaterShapes, ‘conventional wisdom has held that many of the advances in watershape design incubate in the commercial realm and then slowly percolate over to the residential market as our clients ask for features they’ve seen on vacation and elsewhere.’

‘That paradigm holds up to this day in many ways, but what’s less acknowledged

5-yrsBy Brian Van Bower

‘Not long ago,’ wrote Brian Van Bower at the start of his Aqua Culture column for the November 2010 edition of WaterShapes, ‘I was reminded in a big way of the importance of understanding the international nature of our industry.’

‘It was July, and my Genesis 3 partners . . . and I were on the Gold Coast near Brisbane, Australia, presenting a program at the Splash! Conference – an experience that, once again, underscored the fact that

10-year logoBy David Tisherman

‘The creation of something outstanding, something that stirs an emotional response, something that establishes an ongoing, extraordinary experience for clients and anyone else who sees our work all starts with the passion we have in our hearts for art and its intimate relationship to what we do as watershapers.’

That’s how David Tisherman opened his Details column in the October 2005 edition of WaterShapes.  He continued:  ‘I believe that unless you appreciate and

10-year logoBy Brian Van Bower

‘Through the years,’ wrote Brian Van Bower at the head of his Aqua Culture column in the October 2005 issue of WaterShapes, ‘more than a few watershaping professionals have asked me how to break through and start working with high-end clients.  

‘I respond by giving them the disappointing news that there is no magic key here:  Serving the high end takes

9-9 zaretsky feature 1For many years, Bruce Zaretsky faced the annual need to generate enough income to keep his business and his staff going through New York's long, cold winters.  Here's a look at few of the most successful sidelines he found in his quest to keep the seasonal wolves at bay.

 

By Bruce Zaretsky

As you read this, some of us in upstate New York are already thinking about

10-year logoBy David Tisherman

‘Few things are as important to the aesthetic impression made by swimming pools, spas and other watershapes as the colors you select to use in and around them,’ wrote David Tisherman in opening his Details column in the September 2005 issue of WaterShapes.  

‘Take tile as an example.  Whether it’s just a waterline detail, a complete interior finish or some elaborate mosaic pattern, it serves to draw the eye into a design.  If the color and material selections work, the scene can become

15yearsagoBy Brian Van Bower

‘The way I see it,’ wrote Brian Van Bower to start his Aqua Culture column in August 2000, ‘we watershapers can look at ourselves in one of two ways:  as diggers of holes in the ground that hold water, or as artists working with one of the most exciting mediums on the planet.  For a lot of reasons, I like the second of those options, because the first is passive – the sole goal being to contain the water – while the second gets me more

For someone who started out as a pool designer who never visited his clients' backyards, Jeromey Naugle has come a long, long way -- and knows how important a part digital technology has played in his progress as a professional 'paradise expert.'
For someone who started out as a pool designer who never visited his clients' backyards, Jeromey Naugle has come a long, long way -- and knows how important a part digital technology has played in his progress as a professional 'paradise expert.'
By Jeromey Naugle

Back in 2001, I took a job working for a high-volume pool-construction firm as one of its 30 salespeople.  For the first four years or so, I did all of my design work by hand.  

Quantity was always king in that operation, so I never even left the office:  Someone would hand me a set of plans and I’d start working, despite the fact I’d never walked the site, seen its surroundings or had any

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