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As is true of many modern cities, the early development of Anaheim, Calif., was all about its approach to managing water. In the following text and images, watershaper and consultant Mark Holden discusses how this history led recently to the completion of a compact public park in which an unusual watershape graphically demonstrates the way water was harnessed and used in the 19th Century to fuel the region’s agricultural and civic growth.
As is true of many modern cities, the early development of Anaheim, Calif., was all about its approach to managing water.  In the following text and images, watershaper and consultant Mark Holden discusses how this history led recently to the completion of a compact public park in which an unusual watershape graphically demonstrates the way water was harnessed and used in the 19th Century to fuel the region’s agricultural and civic growth.
By Mark Holden

More than three years ago, I was approached by a talented landscape architect (and good friend) to look at project with an interesting twist:  the celebration of the agricultural history of a well-known California city.  

I’ve long been fascinated by history and have taught the history of art and architecture in a variety of settings, so when Lance Walker (then principal at The Collaborative West, San Clemente, Calif.) called me, I was keenly motivated to hear more about his plan to pay homage to those who had jump-started a major modern community by harnessing a natural watercourse to

Concrete is the primary building material used by most watershapers, but it seems to award-winning concrete artist/architectural designer Fu-Tung Cheng that designers and installers alike should be encouraged to exploit more of the material’s flexibility and power when developing aesthetic elements in and around water. Here, he offers his perspective on creating interior and exterior waterfeatures with this amazing potential in mind.
Concrete is the primary building material used by most watershapers, but it seems to award-winning concrete artist/architectural designer Fu-Tung Cheng that designers and installers alike should be encouraged to exploit more of the material’s flexibility and power when developing aesthetic elements in and around water. Here, he offers his perspective on creating interior and exterior waterfeatures with this amazing potential in mind.
By Fu-Tung Cheng

I’ve never been entirely comfortable with the term “decorative concrete.”  To me, the pairing of the words has always implied that one merely applies material over a substrate in the way a baker might apply icing to decorate a cake.  Instead, I see concrete as inherently profound.  More than appliqué, it is a medium that has long been used functionally as well as expressively.  

In my own case, I feel far more creatively engaged in my work when I merge my thinking about those dual potentials of function and art.  Historically, in fact, I believe that when the two become an inseparable one, we recognize and celebrate these works as rising to the level of great design.  

In my own case, I began using concrete as an expressive medium a few decades back, when I was among the pioneers in designing and installing concrete countertops in contemporary kitchens.  As both designer and builder, by the year 2000 I had

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