WaterShapes

The web site for all professionals and consumers who've made or want to make water a part of their lives

Animal Applications

Marine and zoological exhibits have always presented watershapers with a variety of specific technical challenges, not the least of which is devising a waterproofing system that will keep these vessels watertight, the viewing areas dry and the animal life safe.  Here, Michael Mudrick and Elena Danke of Aquafin discuss a variety of lessons to be learned in pursuing these projects – and how they apply to other watershapes as well.
Marine and zoological exhibits have always presented watershapers with a variety of specific technical challenges, not the least of which is devising a waterproofing system that will keep these vessels watertight, the viewing areas dry and the animal life safe. Here, Michael Mudrick and Elena Danke of Aquafin discuss a variety of lessons to be learned in pursuing these projects – and how they apply to other watershapes as well.
By Michael Mudrick & Elena Danke

Marine and zoological exhibits have always presented watershapers with a variety of specific technical challenges, not the least of which is devising a waterproofing system that will keep these vessels watertight, the viewing areas dry and the animal life safe.  Here, Michael Mudrick and Elena Danke of Aquafin discuss a variety of lessons to be learned in pursuing these projects – and how they apply to other watershapes as well.

Designing, engineering and installing watershapes for zoological and aquarium applications is never a casual exercise, especially when it comes to waterproofing.  

Not only do you have to find a product or combination of products that can accommodate various structural penetrations, adhere to all of the materials being used and, quite often, conform to irregularly shaped surfaces:  Whatever material or system you select must also

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Artful Education

As is true of many modern cities, the early development of Anaheim, Calif., was all about its approach to managing water.  In the following text and images, watershaper and consultant Mark Holden discusses how this history led recently to the completion of a compact public park in which an unusual watershape graphically demonstrates the way water was harnessed and used in the 19th Century to fuel the region’s agricultural and civic growth.
As is true of many modern cities, the early development of Anaheim, Calif., was all about its approach to managing water. In the following text and images, watershaper and consultant Mark Holden discusses how this history led recently to the completion of a compact public park in which an unusual watershape graphically demonstrates the way water was harnessed and used in the 19th Century to fuel the region’s agricultural and civic growth.
By Mark Holden

More than three years ago, I was approached by a talented landscape architect (and good friend) to look at project with an interesting twist:  the celebration of the agricultural history of a well-known California city.  

I’ve long been fascinated by history and have taught the history of art and architecture in a variety of settings, so when Lance Walker (then principal at The Collaborative West, San Clemente, Calif.) called me, I was keenly motivated to hear more about his plan to pay homage to those who had jump-started a major modern community by harnessing a natural watercourse to

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Recent comments

  • Guest - Dave

    How is it that this would not be considered hazardous? A misstep could easily lead to a fall or broken ankle. I love this look and have rejected the design even on residential projects because I was sure someone would injure themselves. Anyone else think this would be a lawsuit waiting to happen?...
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Concrete Expressions

Concrete is the primary building material used by most watershapers, but it seems to award-winning concrete artist/architectural designer Fu-Tung Cheng that designers and installers alike should be encouraged to exploit more of the material’s flexibility and power when developing aesthetic elements in and around water. Here, he offers his perspective on creating interior and exterior waterfeatures with this amazing potential in mind.
Concrete is the primary building material used by most watershapers, but it seems to award-winning concrete artist/architectural designer Fu-Tung Cheng that designers and installers alike should be encouraged to exploit more of the material’s flexibility and power when developing aesthetic elements in and around water. Here, he offers his perspective on creating interior and exterior waterfeatures with this amazing potential in mind.
By Fu-Tung Cheng

I’ve never been entirely comfortable with the term “decorative concrete.”  To me, the pairing of the words has always implied that one merely applies material over a substrate in the way a baker might apply icing to decorate a cake.  Instead, I see concrete as inherently profound.  More than appliqué, it is a medium that has long been used functionally as well as expressively.  

In my own case, I feel far more creatively engaged in my work when I merge my thinking about those dual potentials of function and art.  Historically, in fact, I believe that when the two become an inseparable one, we recognize and celebrate these works as rising to the level of great design.  

In my own case, I began using concrete as an expressive medium a few decades back, when I was among the pioneers in designing and installing concrete countertops in contemporary kitchens.  As both designer and builder, by the year 2000 I had

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